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Snowmobiles in the Valley

Snowmobiles in the Valley

  You know it’s truly winter in Red River when the first trailer or flatbed truck loaded with a ton of snowmobiles comes down Highway 38 from Bobcat Pass into town. You’ll see them parked at lodges, along the side streets and in the municipal parking lot. No one has ever been able to track how many private sleds make their way to Red River and the surrounding trails and meadows of the Kit Carson National Forest. Machines registered in Red River can be counted, but machines hauled in and registered in surrounding states are a number for conjecture or a good  crystal ball. FYI: The state of New Mexico requires a day use permit for all OHVs/snowmobiles. Save time by purchasing your permit in advance with the online licensing system. We do know how many sleds are operated by Red River’s professional snowmo tour companies: the Sled Shed on West Main St. and Bobcat Pass Wilderness Adventures located at 9,800 feet at the top of Bobcat Pass on...

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Haulin’ In from Out of State

Haulin’ In from Out of State

  For out-of-state riders who bring their own sleds to ride, a non-resident permit is required by the state of New Mexico to ride on public lands. This applies to Snowmobiles, ATVs, Dirt Bikes and any Offroad Vehicles. Familiarize yourself with NM law. For instance, all persons who are under 18 years of age are required to take a New Mexico-Approved Snowmobile Safety Course, and obtain a snowmobile safety certificate when riding on public lands. Snowmobiles are fun, a great way to see sights at the top of the world, but they are not toys. Treat them with the kind of respect that a powerful machine deserves. Use your head for something other than a place to put your helmet. For more information, go online at www.mvd.newmexico.gov. The site provides online registration, with info on laws and regulations. Enjoy yourself and, above all, be...

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Snowmobiling the High Country

Snowmobiling the High Country

  One thing that has remained constant from the beginnings of snowmos till today is the lifetime of memories made by visiting places only accessible by snow machines and helicopters. You could walk or ride a horse but it’s not a good idea if you’re interested in survival for you and the horse. Sled Shed, Bobcat Pass Wilderness Adventures and Red River Offroad are still in operation in the Red River area. Each offers qualified, responsible and professional guided tours to various high country destinations. They run throughout the winter, November through March, seven days a week, depending on trail conditions. They provide all necessary equipment and clothing, but don’t forget to take a camera. Information about the tour companies is available at the Red River Visitor’s Center in the Conference...

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Snowmobiling – A Look Back

Snowmobiling – A Look Back

  A Little History It is believed that the first snowmobile came to the Red River Valley around 1966 when high country resident Johnnie Mutz purchased a Johnson Skee Horse to use both for ranch work and as a toy to play in the snow. The Skee Horse came in three different sizes, including a wide track model made for greater stability. The machines also had  “Snow Track” traction systems and came with the “new” Torque Sensitive Drive.  They were equipped with a new soft suspension and a disc brake. It also had lock-out neutral gears and a high-low beam headlight. Classy! By the early 1970s, tour companies were operating in Red River. Gene Addison who ran Jeep tours in summer added snowmobiles. He found that people lured to town by the Red River Ski Area were eager for the opportunity to witness the scenic beauty available only with these noisy, exciting machines that most folks had never seen. Pat Lamb was another Texas transplant who conducted snowmo tours...

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